Why Green Tea?

Green Tea

Green tea is has been used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat many ailments for at least 4000 years; however, it’s not until recently that western medicine has begun to pay attention to the many healing properties of Green Tea.

Green tea is one herbal option that you can be used to treat acne.

What is Green Tea?

Green tea comes from the same plant that produces the black tea most of us are used to, but the difference is in the processing. Green tea is dried, but not fermented. The shorter processing gives green tea a lighter flavor than black tea. It also helps keep all the beneficial chemicals intact, which is why green tea is so good for everyone.

Scientific research shows that green tea provides many health benefits. Green tea is a strong antioxidant which plays a key role in preventing cancer. It also has the same effect as your omega 3 fatty acids have on cholesterol; it increases the good cholesterol while lowering the artery clogging bad cholesterol. It also functions as an antibiotic helping the body get rid of infections, it can reduce inflammation, and rid your body of toxins. There are few medical conditions in which drinking green tea has not been reported to help.

How does Green Tea help in acne?

Green tea also helps to reduce inflammation, hormonal activity and aids in detoxification – which is all good news for acne sufferers. With the added benefit that it is safe, it seems that drinking green tea for acne is a win-win situation. It has many beneficial properties which promote good all-round health with little or no known side effects and for the price, it’s definitely a herbal treatment thats worth trying.

What about wrinkles, skin sag and other signs of aging?

Can green tea help? Considering their well-documented antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, topical green tea polyphenols are likely to slow down the development of some signs of aging. Whether green tea can actually diminish wrinkles and prevent skin from sagging is far more uncertain.

P.s A glass of whisky in Scotland in the thirties cost lesser than a cup of tea.